Healthy Aging

The good news: Americans are living longer and living more active lifestyles. Here are some of the most important things you can do to stay healthy, active and independent through the years. No matter how old you are, it is never too late to begin taking care of yourself.
  1. Healthcare
  2. Lifestyle
  3. Your Safety

See a Healthcare Provider Regularly


Visiting your health care provider regularly helps catch problems early, making them easier to treat. You can also find out about screening tests and immunizations you might need. You and your health care provider will decide together how often you should be seen.

Get Insurance Coverage


Having health insurance is essential. The Arizona State Health Insurance Assistance Program (SHIP) is a free health-benefits counseling service for Medicare beneficiaries and their families or caregivers. SHIP is an independent program funded by federal agencies and is not affiliated with the insurance industry. Call 602-542-4446 or statewide 1-800-432-4040. 

Arizona Health Care Cost Containment System (AHCCCS) offers health insurance for individuals 65 and older. For those who qualify, there are no monthly premiums. Call 602-417-7200 or statewide 1-800-331-5090.


Take Care of Your Teeth


Over the past 50 years, there has been an improvement in the nation's oral health. Most middle-aged and older adults can expect to keep their natural teeth over their lifetime. Tooth loss is not a natural part of aging, it is caused by untreated mouth and gum disease. Taking prescription medications can cause dry mouth, which can also increase your risk of tooth decay. What else can you do to maintain good oral health? Check out these tips.

Regular check-ups allow your dentist to catch problems early. Stick to the schedule of visits your dentist recommends for you. Find a dentist or dental provider near you. Reduced Fee and Community Dental Clinics in Arizona

Use Chronic Disease Self Management Programs (CDSMP)

Managing chronic conditions as we age is key. CDSMP workshops are free, evidenced based and designed to help people with chronic conditions live healthy lives and gain self-confidence in their ability to control their symptoms. Small-group, highly interactive workshops are six weeks long, meeting once a week for 2 ½ hours, and are facilitated by a pair of leaders, one or both of whom are non-health professionals with chronic diseases themselves.

What topics are covered in the Workshop?

  • Dealing with difficult emotions, frustration, fatigue, pain, and isolation
  • Managing symptoms
  • Goal setting
  • Problem solving
  • Falls Prevention
  • Nutrition
  • Understanding medications
  • Making informed treatment decisions
  • Increasing strength, stamina, and flexibility through better fitness
  • How to communicate more effectively with family, friends, and health professionals
Who should participate?
Workshops are designed to help people with ongoing health problems manage them more effectively. Anyone with a chronic condition such as diabetes, arthritis, heart disease, asthma, or any other on-going health problem should participate. Caregivers or family members who serve as caregivers are welcomed.

For a free class near you, visit http://azlwi.org/.

Alzheimer's and Dementia Related Diseases



 What is Dementia?


Dementia is a general term for a decline in mental ability severe enough to interfere with daily life.

What is Alzheimer's?


Alzheimer's is a fatal brain disease that causes a slow decline in memory, thinking and reasoning skills. It is the most common form of dementia.

Diagnosis & Treatment


If you or a loved one have concerns about memory loss or other symptoms of Alzheimer's or a related dementia, it is important to be evaluated by a physician.

There are medications available to help ease symptoms, but currently there is no cure.

More Information:



Caregivers for Alzheimer's and Dementia Face Special Challenges


Though the care provided by family members of people with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias is somewhat similar to the help provided by caregivers of people with other conditions, dementia caregivers tend to provide more extensive assistance. Family caregivers of people with dementia are more likely to assist with more activities of daily living. This responsibility can take an emotional, physical, and financial toll, but knowledge of available resources can help relieve the stress. Research shows that caregivers who access support activities regularly are healthier and better able to provide care.

Alzheimer’s Association Desert Southwest Chapter 24/7 Helpline: 1-800-272-3900

Arizona 24-HOUR Senior Help Line: 602-264-4357

Additional Resources



  • We created FindHelpPhoenix.org and its Spanish partner site EncuentraAyudaPhx.org to give Maricopa County residents an easy way to find free and almost free health and social services for themselves. There is a section especially designed for Senior needs. The website is easy to use and available where there is internet access, including smartphones. 

    FindHelpPhoenix is divided into multiple categories of services. Users can look for medical services, legal help, and affordable housing, and many other services. The approximate 1,500 resources are, checked for accuracy, and the information for each service is just what you need: location, a description of the service, cost, and a phone number/website link to make contact.

  • The Senior HELP LINE through the Area Agency on Aging, Region One, provides information, referral and assistance to older adults and caregivers. Trained social workers can assist in answering questions about a variety of services, including transportation, housing, long-term care, home-delivered meals, home care and other services. Assistance is available in English and Spanish, 24 hours a day 7 days a week. 602 264-HELP (4357) or 888 264-2258. A comprehensive Maricopa County Elder Resource Guide is also available online or by calling 602 254-4357.